Tag Archives: private cloud

Implementing your own corporate drop box ?

Upon perusing the Intel Cloud Builders site for interesting new cloudy vendors and reference architectures, I came across an interesting new company called Oxygen Cloud.  Although Storage as a Service is a reasonably well formed concept, much of the attention has been around public provider services such as livedrive, drop box or backup with products such as EMC Mozy. This is all well and good, but a number of companies have concerns over how the “public cloud” type products align to corporate policy. Take drop box for example, the ease of how data is shared or migrated across to other devices maybe doesn’t align to how they want to control one of an organisations most valuable commodities.. data.

So how does an organisation offer device agnostic storage, not based on the contraints of conventional file systems, in such a fashion where they maintain control ? Ultimately there are 101 ways to skin a cat… but as far as skinning cats goes, I quite like this one.

The Back End

You take a product like EMC Atmos; EMC Atmos is what we call cloud optimised storage. In real terms this means the way data is stored, how available it is, how its tiered across different costed storage and where it is stored geographically is handled by repeatable policy, not only this, but also meta data is leveraged to the nth degree (beyond that of traditional metadata uses in traditional file system). I won’t re-invent the explanation as EMC has done a good job of explaining this concept with pretty pictures (video below).

Atmos itself has a fair amount to it, but my point being  is that this use of metadata means that not only can the way data is handled be derived from this meta data, but now the infrastructure can have some awareness the context of data, context which is relevant to a front end such as Oxygen Cloud. Yes Atmos can deliver storage with NFS or CIFS, this is fine, but not overly exciting. The cool part is giving a front end direct access to the context of a file or a set of files using REST, rather than just last modified date and all the usual stuff. The metatags can be used to define the segregation of data in a muti-tenant environment or application specific elements, such as how a file can be shared and with whom.

Also, with Atmos being scale out storage the upper limits of scalability or need is say endless ? (or as near as), with the beauty of the storage being content addressable and not based around hierarchal file systems meaning that as the system is grown, you are not constrained and challenged by overly complex file system structures which need to be maintained.

Clearly availability is important, but hey..  this is expected. Needless to say, the system handles it very well.


The Front End

I’m not going to spend a great deal of time upping my word count on this section, as Oxygen Cloud have some very descriptive videos (further down), but the key things here are that the company controls the data in their own way. We have LDAP/AD integration, full access controls, we can set expiration of a link if we do share a file publicly, encryption at all point of a files transit and file can be presented as a normal explorer/finder plugin (same way we view normal CIFS shares) or files can be accessed via devices such as iPhone/Pad.  One nice feature for me is that if a phone is stolen or an employ leaves, the organisation can sever access to data/directories on a per user or device basis.

Anyway, worth spending a bit of time watching the below :


I shall be building this solution out on the lab over the next month or so (as much as the day job allows), so watch this space for more info and a revised review.

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EMC World 2011 – Las Vegas – day 1

So after the first day at EMC World what Marvels of technology have been announced ?
What groundbreaking nuggets of geeky goodness to be announced. So, first things first VPLEX ! looks like they may have cracked it..   Active/active storage over a synchronous distances, Geoclusters will never be the same again !!..   and also a slightly ambiguous announcement around integration with Hadoop opensource (more to follow on that).

What was the message of the day though ? What was this years theme..   This year EMC are talking about Big data and the cloud. Clearly recent acquisitions of Isilon and Greenplum have planted EMC’s head firmly back in the clouds.  Greenplum giving end users the ability to scale out Database architectures for data analytics to mammoth scale with Greenplums distributed node architecture and massive parallel processing capabilities. To br frank, learning about the technology was borderline mind numbing, but my god its a cool technology. Then we have large scale out NAS with Isilon and its OneFS system giving the ability to present massive NAS repositories and scale NAS on a large scale. So obviously, EMC are talking about big data.

I also had the opportunity to sit in on an NDA VNX/VNXe session and what they’re going to do is….    aaah, I’m not that stupid. But needless to say, there are some nice additions on the way, the usual thing with higher capacity smaller footprint drives and getting more IO in less U space, but also some very cool stuff on the way which will enable EMC to offer a much cheaper entry point for compliance ready storage..  watch this space.

In true style EMC threw out some interesting IDC touted metrics further justifying the need to drive storage efficiencies and re-iterating the fact that there will always be a market for storage. So, our digital universe consists of 1.2 Zettabytes of data, currently, of which 90% of that is unstructured data and that figure is predicted to grow by x44 over this decade. Also 88% of fortune 500 companies have to deal with Botnet attacks on a regular basis and have to contend with 60 Million Malware variants.  So making this relevant, the 3 main pain points of end users are; firstly our time old friend budget, then explosive data growth and securing data.

So how have EMC addressed these ? Well, budget is always a fun one to deal with, but with efficiencies in storage by way of deduplication, compression, thin provisioning and auto tiering of data, end users should get more bang for their buck. Also, EMC easing up on the rains with pricing around Avamar and the low entry point of VNXe, this should help the case. Dealing with explosive data growth again tackles with deduplication, compression, thin provisioning and auto tiering of data, but also now with more varied ways of dealing with large sums of data with technologies such as Atmos, greenplum, Isilon. Then the obvious aquisition of RSA to tie in with the security message, all be it that has had its challenges.

I’m also recently introduced the concept of a cloud architect certification track and the concept of a Data Scientist (god knows, but I’ll find out). So I went over to the proven professionals lounge and had a chat with the guys that developed the course. Essentially it gives a good foundation for steps to consider when architecting a companies private cloud, around Storage, virtualisation, networking and compute. If you’re expecting a consolidated course which covers the storage consolidate courseware, Cisco DCNI2, DCUCD course and VMware install configure manage,  then think again, but it does set a good scene as an overlay to understanding these technologies. It also delves into some concepts around cloud service change management and control considerations and the concept of a cloud maturity model (essentially EMM, but more cloud specific). I had a crack at the practice exam and passed with 68%, aside from not knowing the specific cloud maturity terms and EMC specific cloud management jargon anyone with knowledge of servers, Cisco Nexus and networking, plus virtualization shouldn’t have to many issues, but you may want to skim over the video training package.

There was also a nice shiny demo from the Virtual Geek Chad Sakkac showing the new Ionix UIM 2.1 with Vcloud integration using CSC’s cloud service to demonstrate not only the various subsets of multi tenancy, but also mobility between disparate systems. When they integrate with public cloud providers such as Amazon EC2 and Azure, then things will really hot up, but maybe we need some level of cloud standards in place ?…   but we all know the problem with standards, innovation gives way to bureaucracy and slows up…   but then again with recent cloud provider issues, maybe it couldn’t hurt to enforce a bit of policy which allows the market to slow up a little and take a more considered approach to the public cloud scenario..   who knows ?

Anyway.. watch this space..  more to come